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Da Vinci is 'Fun...Nonsense' says Tom Hanks, Christians Disagree

Hollywood actor, Tom Hanks, insisted that religious groups and leaders whom are planning boycott the Da Vinci code film are taking things too seriously, while some Christian leaders disagree.
( [email protected] ) May 12, 2006 09:29 PM EDT

Hollywood actor, Tom Hanks, insisted that religious groups and leaders whom are planning boycott the Da Vinci code film are taking things too seriously, while some Christian leaders disagree.



"The Da Vinci Code challenges Jesus' identity and deeds, the content of the Bible, the origin of the church, the motives of early Christian leaders and the relevance of the church today — but it does so without any historical, logical or theological credibility," said the website for Focus on the Family, U.S.-based evangelical group.



Hanks, who will play the main character Robert Langdon, called the film "all sorts of hooey and fun kind of scavenger-hunt-type nonsense" in an interview with London-newspaper Evening standard, ahead of the move’s May 19 release date.



"We always knew there would be a segment of society that would not want this movie to be shown," Tom Hanks said, referring to religious groups whom have called for boycotting the film.



The two-time academy-award winner said the film-adaptation of the bestselling novel is "a…good story and a lot of fun…that never hurts."



A few Christian scholars voiced concern that since the Da Vinci Code claims to be based on reality – especially in the beginning – those who are unknowledgeable of Christianity will be misled.



"The Da Vinci Code was heavily promoted as the product of meticulous research. Many reviewers praised its supposed accuracy and profundity. Sorry, but readers have been sadly misinformed," said Sandra Miesel, co-author of ‘The Da Vinci Hoax,’ a book that seeks to debunk the claims made in the Da Vinci Code.



The suspense-mystery thrillers set the story in the modern time, where the Vatican and Opus Dei, a Catholic organization, has supposedly conspired together in a major cover-up concerning the life of Jesus.



The novel claims that Jesus and Mary Magdalene were in fact married and bore descendents. Much of the novels claims have been based on the Gnostic Gospel, which were not included in the canonical Bible.



"The Gnostic Gospels — which aren’t really ‘gospels’ in the sense of narratives about the life of Jesus — are texts produced by heretics 50 years to several centuries after our canonical Gospels. They describe a ‘spiritual’ Christ who is neither true God nor true man but a filmy illusion," said Miesel.