Relaymedia

Poll Shows Majority Favor to end Church and Monarch Link

( [email protected] ) Apr 27, 2004 11:41 AM EDT

A new poll carried out by the Communicate Research shows that a majority of MPs in favour of ending the historic link between the Church of England and the state.

The result is not surprising as both the politicians and Christians appear to have growing interest in reforming church-state links. In 2002, the Evangelical Alliance first launched an inquiry on the subject. Last year the Fabian Society called for a shake-up in relations between church and state.

Researchers quizzed 106 Labour MPs, 63 Conservatives, and 32 from smaller parties. The figures from Communicate Research show that 57% of a representative sample of members is in favour of disestablishment.

The data was also weighted to reflect the distribution of parties in the House of Commons. There was an even greater majority in favour of disestablishment among Labour MPs and those from the smaller parties than the Conservatives.

According to the traditional practice of United Kingdom, the Queen is officially both the supreme governor of the state and the church. It is regarded by many as anomaly.

United Kingdom is one of the powerful countries in the Western hemisphere that tries hard to maintain the long standing heritage of Christianity. Particularly, the unique constitutional position of the Queen may have reflected that her governance should go in parallel with the Christian heritage.

Recently, Tony Blair's decision to appoint gay clergyman Canon Jeffrey John as the Dean of St Albans drew criticism from some church traditionalists. There is a clear divide between the values of the church and the government.

Figures such as former Archbishop of African Anglican Church, Desmond Tutu have also called for reform of the way that the Archbishop of Canterbury is appointed and recognition that such decisions effect the whole Anglican communion, not just the Church of England.

37% of all MPs believed disestablishment would happen in the next 10 years.