Relaymedia

Pastors say ‘Christian Festival’ will do Positive for Kids in Community

( [email protected] ) Mar 11, 2004 09:00 AM EST

Pensacola, FL.—The Morris Court and Attucks Court communities have a fun but positive way of spending their spring break during a week-long festival held annually, with this year’s theme being “The Christian Festival”. Pastors and leaders of local churches believe the festival will help promote a positive atmosphere for kids in the communities.

"It's an excellent opportunity to do something positive in the community, and it gives kids something to do during spring break," said Elder Melvin Burnett, 46, pastor at Obedient in Faith Ministry, who said he was born and grew up in Morris Court. "Those kids probably don't get to the beach, but this is something they can talk about right in the center of their own community."

The festival, sponsored this year by the New Life Christian Center and the Obedient in Faith Ministry, will go for 10 days, beginning this Friday and going on through March 21. Last year’s week-long festival was called “Save the Children”.

New Life Christian Center co- pastor Janice Crenshaw said all festival is good opportunity for all Christians.

"Our church will benefit from this, but it's not a fund-raiser. It's a community thing, period," she said. "New Life wants to participate in this as an opportunity to witness for Christ. Our praise and worship team and church choir will be singing to spread the Gospel."

Other than performances from local church groups, choirs and step teams, the festival will offer carnival rides and food booths. The entrance fee will cost $1 and wristbands can be purchased for $8 to $10.

Boxing champion Roy Jones of Pensacola will also make several appearances.

Johnny "Trim" Dixon, 68, is heading the festival and also serves a recreation specialist at Malcolm Yonge Community Center.

"It's my fun, bringing people in for this," said Dixon, who has nearly 50 years of experience working with the city’s recreation.

What’s most important to the workers planning the event is "to see the joy on the faces of kids who have something positive to do,” said Burnett.