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Concerned Christians Launched Petition For Flushing

The Committee of Concerned Christians of Queens (CCCQ) launched a petition for a people's development plan of the Municipal Lot 1, Flushing, calling upon the public to voice their needs and concerns t
( [email protected] ) Feb 26, 2005 08:28 PM EST

New York - Feb 24, the Committee of Concerned Christians of Queens (CCCQ) launched a petition for a people's development plan of the Municipal Lot 1, Flushing, calling upon the public to voice their needs and concerns to the government, so that "all can have a fair share of benefits to this great city's cultural and economic growth".

In the press conference, which was held in the St. George's Church, main leaders of the CCCQ presented actions for the Christians to serve the society and the public.

The plan of Municipal Lot 1, Flushing will be finally launched at the end of this year or the beginning of next year. According to CCCQ, a land measures 1,650,000sq. ft. will be sold to the developer, from whom the government will receive at least $80 million usd. Meanwhile, the developer will make more than $100 million in profit developing Municipal Lot 1.

However, CCCQ said, the people of Flushing should be the first one to receive benefit from this land, because they are the real owner of it.

In the petition, they call on New York City to make sure of the following issues:

- The developer of Municipal Lot 1 should provide at least five percent of the growing building area for community use, free of charge, which is, according to C4-3 zoning, approximately 60,000 sf for community facilities and 25,000 sf for parking requirement. And such facilities should be owned and used for the benefit of the community by a new non-profit organization to be organized by all sectors of the community, including participation by churches.

- NYC should provide at least half of the land sale proceeds of the Municipal Lot 1, Flushing toward the furnishing of and the services provided by these facilities.

- The new development of the Municipal Lot 1 should enhance the parking environment it currently provides to the community.

- The downtown Flushing traffic re-planning should not negatively impact the livelihood of the small business owners in the community.

There are approximately 70,000 to 80,000 Chinese immigrants living in Flushing, the majority of which is from Mainland China, after the year 1990. Many of them are living on supermarkets, restaurants, laundries, and the other small private business.

According to James Chiam, the link man of this campaign, they have not yet communicated with the NYC. However, they prefer to voice their concern actively and positively. "We don't know about the detailed plan of the government, which is expected to be launched by the end of this year, or the beginning of next year. But we want to call on the public to express their concern and needs actively to the government, tell them what their people want."

Rev. David Tsang, the president of CCCQ, said, "Christians should care for and serve the society. We are doing this for people's, not government's benefit."

The CCCQ members include: Rev. David Tsang from Chinese Christian Workers Inc. and The Metropolitan NY Chinese Christian Churches Association, Ms. Lida L Watson from the St. George's Church, Rev. John Chang from the Grace Christian Church of Flushing, Rev. Jae Hong Han from the Shin Kwang Church of New York, Rev. Johnson Yu from the Queens Taiwanese Evangelical Church, Rev. Henry Kwan from the First Baptist Church of Flushing, Rev. Frank Hwang from Our Savior Lutheran Church, Rev. Peter Pan from the harvest Church, Rev. Pok Cheung Lo from the Chinese Christian Herald Crusades, Rev. Timothy Chiu from the New York Theological Education Center, Mr. Paul Xie from the St. George's Church, Mr. Tien H. Tan from the Attorney at Law, Mr, James Chiam, and Mr. Mark Lee.

The petition, which can be downloaded at www.PTLconnections.com, is written in English, Chinese and Korean. CCCQ will collect all signed petitions by Mar 15, and take further action afterwards.