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World Vision Nationwide Annual 30-hour Famine Kicks-Off

Thousands of American teenagers are fasting this weekend while participating in World Vision’s 15th annual 30 Hour Famine. They are reminded of the other millions brothers in the world who are in hung
( [email protected] ) Feb 25, 2006 08:39 PM EST

Thousands of American teenagers are fasting this weekend while participating in World Vision’s 15th annual 30 Hour Famine. They are reminded of the other millions brothers in the world who are in hunger and poverty.

On Feb. 24-25, 30 Hour Famine participants gather as groups - representing schools, churches, youth groups, and civic organizations- and consume only water and fruit juices, according to a statement from World Vision. Famine participants will focus on community-level fundraising activities or charities, for instance, coordinating food drives, serving in soup kitchens, or assisting in homeless shelters.

Chinese Christians across the U.S. are going to participate in the 30 Hour Famine as well. Youth group from the Seattle Chinese Baptist Church will join the youths of Japanese Presby Church and Lighthouse for the 30 Hour Famine. Chinese Evangelical Church of San Diego will join the next 30 Hour Famine in April.

The goal for the 2006 30 Hour Famine is to feed and care for more then 41,500 children in poverty-afflicted countries around the globe, which will cost around $15 million.

The amount of funds raised by the U.S. alone in the 30 Hour Famine for 2005 was $11.6 million. 32,222 children were being fed and cared for with the funds; some of the projects being sponsored include famine in Niger, widespread flooding in Central America, and a major earthquake in Pakistan that displaced more than 2 million people.

The next nationwide 30 Hour Famine date is April 28-29. Besides, as the 30 Hour Famine is an international student movement, about a million young people participate around the globe on different dates throughout the year.

"The 30 Hour Famine has a lasting impact, not just to the children receiving food, care, and education, but to Famine participants who view their own potential to affect change in their world very differently afterward," said Debbie Diederich, national director of the World Vision 30 Hour Famine.