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Egypt's Coup: President Mohammed Morsi Ousted; Christian, Muslim Leaders Draft Roadmap

( [email protected] ) Jul 04, 2013 06:54 AM EDT
Former Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi was overthrown in a military coup on Wednesday, and prominent leaders from both Christianity and Islam have drafted a roadmap plan for reinstating peace in the country.
Protesters against Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi wave national flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo July 3, 2013. The Egyptian president's national security adviser said on Wednesday that a ''military coup'' was under way and army and police violence was expected to remove pro-Mursi demonstrators. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Former Egyptian president Mohammad Morsi was overthrown in a military coup on Wednesday, and prominent leaders from both Christianity and Islam have drafted a roadmap plan for reinstating peace in the country.

Millions of Protestors lined Tahrir Square earlier this week in opposition to the Islamic influence in Egypt’s leadership and constitution. Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president, was once the head of the radical Muslim Brotherhood Movement. Those in opposition to his leadership argue that the Brotherhood was pervading the government, and that radical Islamic principles were ruling the country in a veiled dictatorship.

The Egyptian military had warned Morsi that they would intervene if he and his opponents could not resolve their differences. Morsi refused to step down from his elected position as president, and a military coup took place on Wednesday. Adly Mansour, the supreme justice of the country’s Supreme Constitutional Court, was temporarily instated as Egypt’s president. The country’s Islamic-dominated constitution has been suspended, and governmental elections are expected to take place soon.

Christians, who make up about ten percent of Egypt’s population, had faced persecution since Morsi’s instatement as president. Some had been arrested on the grounds of blasphemy against Islam, and Coptic Christians in Egypt were asked by both Morsi and by United States President Obama not to participate in the recent protests. The Coptic Pope denied the requests, however, maintaining the right to protest. Both Christian and Muslim leaders in opposition to Morsi have united to draft a roadmap plan which calls for early governmental elections.

An aerial view shows protesters against Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi in Tahrir Square in Cairo July 3, 2013. Egypt's armed forces and Islamist President Mursi refused to back down on Wednesday as a deadline for a military takeover passed with rival demonstrators out in force in the streets of Cairo. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem

Protesters, who are against Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, react in Tahrir Square in Cairo July 3, 2013. The head of Egypt's armed forces General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi issued a declaration on Wednesday suspending the constitution and appointing the head of the constitutional court as interim head of state, effectively declared the removal of elected Islamist President Mohamed Mursi. REUTERS/Suhaib Salem

Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of Egypt's President Mohamed Mursi hold pictures of him as they react after the Egyptian army's statement was read out on state TV, at the Raba El-Adwyia mosque square in Cairo July 3, 2013. Egypt's armed forces overthrew elected Islamist President Mursi on Wednesday and announced a political transition with the support of a wide range of political, religious and youth leaders.