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MH370 Latest News Update: Will The Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight Ever be Found?

( [email protected] ) Jul 03, 2015 12:34 PM EDT
With Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 still missing, James Cameron has reportedly lost interest in aiding the search. The latest update was announced just as the two remaining search vessels returned to port in order to refuel.

With Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 still missing, James Cameron has reportedly lost interest in aiding the search. The latest update was announced just as the two remaining search vessels returned to port in order to refuel.

"We asked Mr. Cameron for help in the search effort - whom thus far has shown zero interest in MH370," search volunteer Andre Milne said, as quoted by the Express.

Earlier, Milne theorized that MH370 was deliberately rerouted as a "provocative action" toward the U.S. military outpost at Diego Garcia.

"Whom ever was in control of the flight wanted MH 370 to be observed flying south towards Base Diego Garcia by the inhabitants of the Maldive Atolls during daylight hours as reported by witnesses," he wrote in a letter to Interpol. However, Milne said that the aircraft was never flown to Diego Garcia, but instead made "a soft ditch landing" before sinking in the Bay of Bengal.

"Any suggestion that MH370 ever landed at Base Diego Garcia is utterly delusional," Milne insisted. He pointed out that the plane would have easily been spotted by Russian spy satellites had such a landing occurred.

Last April, Cameron outlined a strategy for finding MH370 by triangulating a search box based on pings from the flight recorder. The comment led many observers to believe that the Hollywood movie director would offer his deep-sea expertise, which helped him to explore the wreck of the Titanic and WWII German battleship Bismarck. Amateur investigators had hoped Cameron's support would revitalize public interest in the search.

Ongoing investigations have failed to turn up debris coming from the missing aircraft. The two remaining sea vessels, the Fugro Discovery and Fugro Equator, are being used to explore a vast 120,000 square kilometer priority search zone.

The Fugro Discovery and Fugro Equator have recently returned to an Australian port, and will resume the operation after two weeks of resupply. Both vessels had been subject to rough seas during their time in the southern Indian Ocean, where MH370 is believed to have gone down.

Search parties are down one ship, after the Malaysian officials declined to extend the contract for the GO Phoenix.

Theories for the disaster had included failed terrorist plots, government conspiracies, and suicidal flight crew. Other explanations suggest crew disorientation and incapacitation because of fire.

Presently, 239 passengers and crew members remain unaccounted for after Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. Taking off from Kuala Lumpur, the plane was destined for Beijing. Amongst passengers, 153 Chinese nationals were onboard.

News of the disappearance initially sparked a massive multinational search effort to locate the wreck of MH370. Notable contributors included Australia, China, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Korea, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The search involved civilian and military assets. On the web, volunteers spent hours combing through satellite imagery released publically by U.S. company Tomnod.

To date, the MH370 search operation is the largest and most expensive of its kind. Australia, which is leading search efforts, has declared that all underwater search operations will cease next year.

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Editor's Note: According to a theory by Andre Milne, MH370 was deliberately rerouted as a "provocative action" toward the U.S. military outpost at Diego Garcia. Previously, it has been mistakenly reported that Milne has suggested MH370 was flown to Diego Garcia. This information has been corrected.