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Controversial ‘Jesus in the Stars’ Discovery Explained By Historical Researcher

( [email protected] ) Sep 09, 2015 10:00 AM EDT
Historical researcher Miguel Fiol has further explained the details behind his "Jesus in the stars" discovery.
A historical researcher claimed to have discovered an orrery representation of Jesus on the cross on the day He is believed to have died in 33 A.D.
Mike Fiol

In findings released last week, a historical researcher claimed to have discovered an orrery representation of Jesus on the cross on the day He is believed to have died in 33 A.D.

Today the researcher, Miguel Antonio Fiol, took time to clarify details about the unusual discovery.

"Most people simply look at the image, which by itself is rather meaningless," he responds.

For the formation to actually represent the crucifixion, Fiol points out, requires satisfying fundamental, non-arbitrary rules beyond the heliocentric graphic.

"It's not simply about connecting the planetary dots. Each dot has specific rules. For instance, Saturn, because of the rings (as a halo or crown of thorns), has to be the 'head'," Fiol adds.

A further requirement involves Uranus and Venus. "Those two planets are the only ones in our solar system that spin clockwise on their axis. For a true representation and not simply a 'picture,' the hands and feet must rotate in opposition...like real hands and feet."

The result is a very limited number of alignment possibilities. "It means that from a top-down view, you need at least five planets in the proper formation (i.e., hands out, feet together, head centered) and proportion with Saturn as the head and Uranus and Venus each as one of the hands and feet," says Fiol, a history grad who discovered the alignment while researching a manuscript on universal geometry. "Satisfying all these requirements on a NASA-based orrery and landing on March/April 33 A.D. is highly improbable to say the least."

Fiol also says that due to the greatly varying speeds each planet travels on its orbit around the sun, the window for the alignment to exist is extremely small.

"Once it happens, it doesn't last long. For example, Venus travels far faster than Uranus. That it happened over the month in 33 A.D. which basically covers Lent is intriguing," he concludes.

Moreover, the amateur historian found that after the year 33 A.D., the alignment does not appear again for nearly seven hundred years, confirming the rarity. "Between the year zero and roughly 700 A.D., it happened...once...for a month, peaking around the beginning of April 33 A.D."

Still, Fiol is the first to concede that the orrery-based discovery is not 'scientific.' "It's a marriage of the orrery and the date, the requirements, the velocity, the time, the history and the paucity," he responds.

When asked when we might see the alignment going forward, Fiol notes that it will not satisfy the rules again until perhaps the twenty-ninth century.

"Is that not rare?" he says.