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Neuroscience Researchers Found the 'Spirit of Christmas' inside People's Brains

( [email protected] ) Dec 18, 2015 07:54 PM EST
There are some interesting developments in the field of neuroscience.  A study found how some people are so into the holiday spirit while others seem to lack it entirely. Researchers found that people who enjoy Christmas had different neural activity inside their brains. The findings could help people know if they have inner Scrooginess.
Ebenezer Scrooge of Christmas Carol

There are some interesting developments in the field of neuroscience.  A study found how some people are so into the holiday spirit while others seem to lack it entirely. Researchers found that people who enjoy Christmas had different neural activity inside their brains. The findings could help people know if they have inner Scrooginess.

The study, published in the peer-reviewed British Medical Journal, explains that there are certain parts of the brain that is responsible for the celebration of Christmas. Using MRI scans, scientists located the brain networks that are associated with holiday spirit.

In order to draw their conclusions, the researchers studied a group of 10 people who said they celebrate Christmas faithfully and another group of 10 people who did not celebrate the holiday. The researchers gave participants a set of Christmas-related pictures. After that, using MRI, the researchers showed the pictures to participants and recorded their brain activities.

Analysis show participants who celebrated Christmas had more brain activity in the parietal lobules, the premotor cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. The parietal lobes are the part of the brain that is related to spirituality and self-transcendence, according to Healthline.com. The premotor cortex is also found active in the Christmas-happy people, and this part of the brain is associated with emotional experiences.

The latest findings could spur the developments of drugs or equipment that help people with "bah humbug" syndrome. 

"Accurate localisation of the Christmas spirit is a paramount first step in being able to help this group of patients," one of the authors said in a published statement from Forbes.

For the next step, researches plan to develop equipment that will unwittingly zap the Christmas-deficient areas of the "Bah Humbug" people. In the same article from Forbes, the researchers explain that they are preparing a patent application of a Santa's hat that people can buy for family members with symptoms.

In an article published in Metro, it listed the things that people say who hate Christmas.

  • 'Ugh snow. I hate snow. It's so annoying. It brings public transport to a standstill and anyway it just turns to brown slush.'
  • 'Christmas jumpers are ugly and cliched, and it's annoying that they are now a thing.'
  • 'Christmas cards are such a waste of time and money. And a waste of a good stamp. And I hate getting them because it means I have to send one back.'
  • 'Christmas starts earlier every year. Have you SEEN that Tesco has its tree up already?'

Are you one of these people? The latest study could help you celebrate the Christmas Season. Happy Holidays!

Tags : Christmas Spirit, Science Study, Brain Study, British Medical Journal, Bah Humbug