Relaymedia

Germany's Anti-Immigration Party Demands Restriction of Islam, Citing Its Incompatibility to Their Constitution

( [email protected] ) May 02, 2016 12:47 PM EDT
Germany came out with a tough stance on Muslim migration demanding a ban on minarets and the burqa, strongly implying that Islam is not compatible in Germany by its Constitution and religious practices.
A rally organized by Muslim leaders calling for open and tolerant society to counter anti-Islamic sentiment.

Germany came out with a tough stance on Muslim migration demanding a ban on minarets and the burqa, strongly implying that Islam is not compatible in Germany by its Constitution and religious practices.

A manifesto entitled "Islam is not part of Germany" earned the support of at least 14 percent in the opinion polls, turning the country's anti-immigration party Alternative for Germany (AfD) to a strong block in the upcoming 2017 federal elections to challenge Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative and other traditional parties.

Germany was among the countries in Europe that cater evacuees from civil war-ravaged countries of Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. Over a million flooded on its gate last year, adding to the already five percent Muslims of the country's total population.

Hans-Thomas Tillschneider, an AfD lawmaker said, "Islam cannot invoke the principle of religious freedom to the same level of Christianity." His group dismissed the suggestion for a dialogue with the Muslim community.

The AfD conference held last Sunday drew 2,000 people in attendance. They were interrupted by over 2,000 left-wing demonstrators who clashed with the police in an attempt to break up the full delegates meeting.

Emotional debate marred their second party congress calling for measures against Islamic symbols of power and brush off the plea for a dialogue with the Muslim community. AfD wants minarets- mosque towers where calls for Muslim prayer is made, and the burqa-encompassing body garments for Muslim women - banned.

Merkel, who is Christian, had maintained that freedom of religion is absolute in Germany.

AfD's bias towards the Muslim earned strong criticism from Germany's Central Council of Muslims describing it as the same as Adolf Hitler's attitude towards the Jews.

Ernst-August Roettger, a delegate from Lueneburg City, tried along with the other few to introduce an amendment on the manifesto calling for acceptance of everybody's religious freedom, but the majority rejected it.