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Samsung Galaxy S7, Not Note 7, Explodes in Man’s Hands

( [email protected] ) Nov 17, 2016 09:29 AM EST
It looks like Samsung is about to face another media nightmare with the news that another of their smartphones has exploded. This time, though, it is not the Galaxy Note 7, but one that's already been released for quite a while, the Galaxy S7.
A Samsung Galaxy sign is seen at the Samsung Galaxy Unpacked 2015 event in New York August 13, 2015. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

It looks like Samsung is about to face another media nightmare with the news that another of their smartphones has exploded. This time, though, it is not the Galaxy Note 7, but one that's already been released for quite a while, the Galaxy S7.

A man from Winnipeg, Canada, Mr. Amarjit Mann claims he was driving when he felt the device start to become warm in his pocket. He took out the Galaxy S7 from his pocket, and it immediately exploded while he was still holding it. The car started filling with smoke, so he proceeded to throw the Samsung Galaxy S7 outside.

Amarjit Mann reportedly suffered from second-degree burns on his hands. His wrists suffered a worse fate as he contracted third-degree burns on it. Mann, who works as a mechanic, was told by doctors that he will have difficulty working his profession for about four weeks due to the burns he got. But Mashable reports that Mann was still thankful that he did not incur worse damages, especially in his eye area, where a spark from the exploding smartphone hit him.

Fortune reports that a statement from a spokesperson from Samsung says they cannot comment on the incident because they have not yet seen the product nor have they analyzed it after the said incident.

"Customer safety remains our highest priority and we remain committed to working with any customer who has experienced an issue with a Samsung product in order to address the customer's concerns. The issues with the Galaxy Note7 are isolated to that model."

This year has not been a good year for Samsung, as they have been plagued with problems in their smartphone line. The Samsung Galaxy Note 7, which was released to be a competitor for the iPhone 7 will be discontinued due to reports of overheating and even explosions.

There have been other reported instances of models of Samsung smartphones heating up, and the latest is the Galaxy S7. It is the highest-end handset for Samsung, and retails for about $669.  The device was released even before the Galaxy Note 7 and has received many positive reviews for its graphics performance and other high-end features.

While Mann's case might be an isolated incident of the Galaxy S7 compared to the many reports of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7, Samsung will have to assure its millions of users that their smartphones are safe and will not endanger them. For Mann though, he has stated that he plans to sue the company for the incident.