SD Cards Will Now Get Their Ratings, Too

Dec 01, 2016 09:39 AM EST
SD cards have been mainstays in the technology industry since their release in 1999.
SD cards marked as 'Speed Class' and 'UHS (Ultra High Speed) Speed Class'. SD Association.

SD cards have been mainstays in the technology industry since their release in 1999. Cameras, mobile phones and digital devices were made more practical and budget-friendly for consumers who could then 'expand' their device memory with the use of SD cards that come in different data sizes. Now, SD cards will be getting their ratings to make it easier for consumers to choose from the wide range of card options.

The SD (Secure Digital) card was developed in the late 1990s by the SD Card Association (SDA) of Japan. It was then a collaborative effort between SanDisk, Panasonic and Toshiba, with the three companies forming SD-3C LLC. Up until today, it is the sole property rights owner of all SD memory cards and auxiliary products.

With many manufacturing licensees from all around the world, SDA wants to standardize SD card classification.

The new SD card classification or rating system is classified into the type of 'speed class', which pertains to writing performance. This is the ability of the SD card to log in data, store it, and retrieve it.

The two major speed class classifications and their qualities are as follows:

1. Speed Class

It is currently marked into four categories:

Class 2: with a 2 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at normal speed, and used for standard video recording.

Class 4: with a 4 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at normal speed, and used for HD and full HD video recording.

Class 6: with a 6 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at normal speed, and used for HD and full HD video recording.

Class 10: with a 10 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at high speed, and used for full HD video recording, HD still image, and continuous shooting.

2. UHS (Ultra High Speed) Speed Class

It is currently marked into two categories:

Class 1: with a 10 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at UHS-I to UHS-II speed, and used for full HD video recording, HD still image, and continuous shooting.

Class 3: with a 30 MB/s minimum serial data, operating at UHS-I to UHS-II speed, and used for 4K2K video recording.

It is important to note that SD cards and devices should be compatible, so checking on manufacturer's specifications is crucial.

Recently, a first class SD card has been released classified as App Performance Class A1, which performs on 10 MB/s. More ratings are under way with the release of more device-specific SD cards.