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Jeremy Clarkson's Netflix 'House of Cars' Release Date: Show to Feature Former ‘Top Gear’ Hosts if Approved

( [email protected] ) May 14, 2015 03:08 PM EDT
Jeremy Clarkson, James May, and Richard Hammond, the former hosts of “Top Gear,” are in talks with several companies in creating a brand new car show outside of the British Broadcasting Corp. If Netflix approves a potential deal with them, the program would be called “House of Cars.”
Football - Chelsea v Paris St Germain - UEFA Champions League Second Round Second Leg - Stamford Bridge, London, England - 11/3/15 Jeremy Clarkson watches from the stands. Reuters / Stefan Wermuth

Jeremy Clarkson, James May, and Richard Hammond, the former hosts of "Top Gear," are in talks with several companies in creating a brand new car show outside of the British Broadcasting Corp. If Netflix approves a potential deal with them, the program would be called "House of Cars."

According to Nicola Methven of The Mirror, the former car show hosts, along with former producer Andy Wilman, are in talks with the popular video streaming service to make a program about cars. The BBC owns the rights to the "Top Gear" name and plans to bring back that show, so they came up with a different catchy name instead.

"If it goes ahead, they're planning to call it House of Cars, which is just genius," a source said to Methven.

Methven reported that the pitched title "House of Cars" is a nod to the popular Netflix political drama "House of Cards," where Kevin Spacey plays as American politician Frank Underwood. In an ironic twist, that Netflix show is based on an adaptation of a 1990 BBC series with the same name.

"Like the BBC, Netflix does not use advertising," Methven wrote. "Whoever signs the stars will be hoping they draw huge audiences."

Methven reported that 55-year-old Clarkson and his team have been pitching their new car show to other broadcasters in the United Kingdom, including ITV; talks were held with that network last week. However, an unnamed source indicated that "potential conflicts of interest with advertisers" could arise from a deal with ITV.

"What would they do if Jaguar or Volvo had a sponsorship deal but they wanted to berate its latest new car?" the source said. "Jeremy doesn't like being told what to do. It could cause huge arguments."

While negotiations for a new car show continue, James Rothwell of the Telegraph reported that Clarkson, Hammond and May have started a worldwide road tour. However, that tour has been rebranded "Clarkson, Hammond and May Live" after the BBC decided to take out its association and "Top Gear" branding from it.

"After many years of practice, it's a good show now," Clarkson said.

Clarkson added that they were hitting the road to satisfy their supporters. According to Rothwell, one million people signed a protest petition after the BBC pulled "Top Gear" when Clarkson had a "fracas" with producer Oisin Tymon; the BBC later ended Clarkson's work contract with the broadcaster.

"People are appreciative of [the live show] and when it's over say, 'That was good fun,'" Clarkson said in a tongue-in-cheek manner. "All those people who want to come genuinely go away with hope in their hearts. We're uplifting. It's almost spiritual."

According to the road tour's website, Clarkson, Hammond and May are scheduled to take their live show across the UK, South Africa, Norway, Poland and Australia this year.

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