Relaymedia

Christian Right-Wingers Blamed By LGBTQ Activists for Orlando Shooting Massacre

( [email protected] ) Jun 14, 2016 11:45 AM EDT
Some gay-rights' activists are expressing concerns and angst on social media about those associated as Christian Conservatives actually causing or contributing to Sunday's shooting massacre at a gay nightclub, Pulse, in Orlando, Fla., during which 50 people died, including the gunman, and 53 more were injured.
People hug after a prayer service at Knowles Memorial Chapel the day after a mass shooting at the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., June 12, 2016. Reuters / CARLO ALLEGRI

Some gay-rights' activists are expressing concerns and angst on social media about those associated as Christian Conservatives actually causing or contributing to Sunday's shooting massacre at a gay nightclub, Pulse, in Orlando, Fla., during which 50 people died, including the gunman, and 53 more were injured.

An American Civil Liberties Union staff attorney, Chase Strangio, on Sunday tweeted:  "the Christian Right is implicated in the slaughter by passing anti-LGBT bills. The Christian Right has introduced 200 anti-LGBT bills in the last six months, and people are blaming Islam for this. No."

Christian right, or religious right, often is a term used to label right-wing Christian political factions that are characterized by their strong support of socially conservative policies. Online definitions of Christian conservatives indicate they principally seek to apply their understanding of the teachings of Christianity to politics, and to public policy by proclaiming the value of those teachings or by seeking to use those teachings to influence law and public policy.  

More people than Strangio drew a moral equivalence between Christianity's teaching on sexuality and the mass shooting, which was executed by a man who swore his allegiance to the Islamic State in a 911 call prior to being killed in a shootout with authorities, reports The Washington Times.

MSNBC contributor Sally Kohn accused people who subscribe to traditional sexual customs of hypocrisy for condemning the murder of gay people, according to The Washington Times. She tweeted: "Always fascinating to watch conservatives who won't support basic non-discrimination laws bash Islamic fundamentalists for being anti-gay."

"You either support the dignity & equal treatment of all LGBT people or you support their systemic dehumanization," Kohn stated in another Twitter post.

"Islamic Extremists kill LGBT people. Christian and Jewish extremists just drive us to commit suicide," Kohn shared in a third Twitter post.

According to The Washington Times, lesbian author Victoria Brownworth responded to a tweet from former Republican governor Mike Huckabee, who had expressed sympathy for the victims of the attack and their families. "We don't want your hypocritical prayers," Brownworth said.

"You led the fight against LGBT people. You promote this every day."

Not everyone agrees with those advocating on behalf of LGBTQ issues, however. One online respondent to the Times stated:  "If these gay people truly think Christianity is the cause of the Orlando atrocity (committed by a Muslim male) ... maybe they should move to a predominantly Muslim country ... see how long they last there before being stoned/burned to death or thrown off a tall building."

Another online respondent, Raphael Semmes, said "The ACLU are radical nut jobs, as seem to be some LGBT activists. It would be like Jewish people blaming Turkey for the holocaust. Christians do not go around yelling ''Allah Akhbar.' These idiots are stuck in the rut of their talking points instead of looking at what really happened. Oh, and bills that treat LGBT's like everyone else instead of giving them the special privileges they demand are NOT NOT NOT anti-LGBT."

The National Center for Lesbian Rights also issued a statement after the Orlando attack, calling for an end to laws that create a "toxic climate" for LGBTQ people.

"In the past two years, cowardly and irresponsible politicians have proposed more than 200 anti-LGBT laws - including those passed this year in North Carolina and Mississippi," said NCLR Executive Director Kate Kendell. "Make no mistake, these laws and the pandering of so many elected officials to those who promote anti-LGBT bias foster a toxic climate."

On Monday, the National Center for Lesbian Rights joined 50-plus, other LGBTQ organizations calling for unity and an end to hate and discrimination. The joint statement shared:  "This national tragedy happened against the backdrop of anti-LGBTQ legislation sweeping this country and we must not forget that in this time of grief. Unity and organized response in the face of hatred is what we owe the fallen and the grieving. Collective resolve across national, racial and political lines will be required to turn the tide against anti-LGBTQ violence. Our response to this horrific act, committed by one individual, will have deep impact on Muslim communities in this country and around the world. We as an intersectional movement cannot allow anti-Muslim sentiment to be the focal point as it distracts from the larger issue, which is the epidemic of violence that LGBTQ people, including those in the Muslim community, are facing in this country." 

 

 

Tags : Orlando Massacre, Orlando Shooting, gay rights, LGBTQ, Muslim, Pulse, Christian Conservatives, Christian Right, Christian Right-Wingers, American Civil Liberties Union, Chase Strangio, Sally Kohn, Victoria Brownworth, National Center for Lesbian Rights, Mike Huckabee