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Britain's New Prime Minister Theresa May Says Christian Faith Guides and Directs Her Decisions

( [email protected] ) Jul 14, 2016 02:29 PM EDT
Britain's new Prime Minister, Theresa May, has revealed that her Christian faith is a significant part of who she is and guides and directs all of her decisions.
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May arrives at 10 Downing Street, in central London July 14, 2016. REUTERS/Paul Hackett

Britain's new Prime Minister, Theresa May, has revealed that her Christian faith is a significant part of who she is and guides and directs all of her decisions.

May, who had previously served in the Home Office for more than six years, was installed as the United Kingdom's new prime minister after David Cameron resigned on Wednesday and her lone rival, Andrea Leadsom, dropped out of the leadership race earlier this week.

The U.K.'s second-ever female leader, May revealed that her Christian faith plays a vital role in her life: "It [Christian faith] is part of me. It is part of who I am and therefore how I approach things," the 59-year-old former home secretary told BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs back in 2014.

"I think it's right that we don't flaunt these things here in British politics. But it is a part of me, it's there and it obviously helps to frame my thinking and my approach," she added.

May was born to a vicar, Reverend Hubert Brasier and his wife Zaidee, which instilled in her a sense of servanthood and desire to help others.

"I grew up the daughter of a local vicar and the granddaughter of a regimental sergeant major. Public service has been a part of who I am for as long as I can remember," May noted in a report.

"I know some politicians seek high office because they are driven by ideological fervor," she added. "I know others seek it for reasons of ambition or glory. My reasons are much simpler. I grew up the daughter of a local vicar and the granddaughter of a regimental sergeant major. Public service has been a part of who I am for as long as I can remember."

She also is an active member of the Church of England: Rev. Jamie Taylor, the vicar at St Andrew's and a friend of May, described her as a "very supportive member" of the historic church and a "hard-working and respected MP".

Taylor added: "We pray weekly for Her Majesty and those set in authority under her, and that prayer will take on a little more significance for us at St. Andrew's in the years ahead...On behalf of all at St Andrew's Church...I warmly congratulate [May] as she prepares to take up the daunting responsibilities before her."

Meanwhile, in her statement following the confirmation that she is to be the U.K.'s next prime minister, May insisted that "Brexit means Brexit and we're going to make a success of it" and emphasized the country will "forge a bold, new, positive role for ourselves in the world. "

She also called for unity, strong leadership, and a positive vision for the future.

"A vision of a country that works not just for the privileged few, but that works for every one of us. Because we are going to give people more control over their lives. That's how, together, we will build a better Britain," she said.