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Atlanta Theater Features 'Gay Bible Stories'

( [email protected] ) May 12, 2017 09:29 AM EDT
"What if it really was Adam and Steve? That’s what the Out Front Theater Company in Atlanta, which stages shows exploring themes relevant to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning, will set out to answer for audiences..."
The fundamentalist slogan "God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve" inspired playwright Paul Rudnick's 1998 play "The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told." Brian Wallenberg

"Gay Versions of Bible Stories." Who would have ever thought it would come to this? Yet, "alternate versions" of Bible characters like Adam and Eve, retold as "Adam and Steve," and a display venturing so far as to portray Mary, Mother of Christ as a lesbian, began as a three week run at The Out Front Theater in Atlanta, Georgia. The site's synopsis advertising the play, "The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told," proceeds thus:

"What if it really was Adam and Steve? That’s what the Out Front Theater Company in Atlanta, which stages shows exploring themes relevant to people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or questioning, will set out to answer for audiences..."

The play, written originally by Paul Rudnick (a professed homosexual) and performed Off Broadway in 1998, began performances at the The Out Front Theater in Georgia this mid-April.

Rudnick is definitely not vague in expressing his intention in writing the piece. In his own words, he unabashedly composed it in order to further a homosexual agenda and to, in comedic style, convey a more version more "believable" to him and compliant with his views:

"I wanted the Garden of Eden in Central Park, and Mary as a lesbian mother, which would certainly help me comprehend Immaculate Conception,"

Thankfully, the theater has received a feedback-outcry among some: “Blasphemous.”Among those (rightly) outraged: Dave Daubenmir, from "Pass the Salt Live" webcast, who is calling for Christians to boycott the daring entertainment.

The devil, Daubenmir insists, is “getting more and more bold." Dave's zeal is tempered, however, by both a sense of sadness as well as a sincere desire to show Christ's love in the process of decrying the performance. He remarks, for example, on the prevalence of anti-Christian entertainment; in nearly the same breath, he also laments the general apathy of Christians in rebuking such behavior:

“Look at this here, these sodomite homosexual spirits down there, they are making fun, again, of the Bible. The Enemy takes [Bible stories] and he counterfeits it and makes our faith look like more and more of a joke. At what point are the people of Atlanta going to push back against this nonsense?”

Does his discouragement disable his personal action as an individual? Hardly. He is still determined to deliver what he calls a "loving rebuke":

“Well, I’m upset about it and we’re going to be down there in Atlanta and we’re just going to bring a loving rebuke to those folks down there.”

Tags : LGBT, Homosexuality