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The Reality of Angels

( [email protected] ) Nov 03, 2007 11:46 AM EDT
If you make the Most High your dwelling--even the LORD, who is my refuge--then no harm will befall you, . . . For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways. (Psalm 91:9-11 NIV)

If you make the Most High your dwelling--even the LORD, who is my refuge--then no harm will befall you, . . . For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways. (Psalm 91:9-11 NIV)

This full-orbed vision of the glories and credentials of Jesus Christ was needed just then by the persecuted Hebrew Christians. And to us in this 20th century of the Christian church, the same revelation comes with Godís authority and meaning. The word that assured the Hebrews reveals to us that the eternal Son was preeminent above Abraham, above Moses, above Aaron and the priests of the Old Testament era.

Much of our Bible study tends to be one-sided. We choose to read what we like. We neglect those portions that seem to have less interest for us. Do you agree?

Among Protestant Christians for several years there has been a rather mystifying psychology. Our Roman Catholic neighbors in their hymnody and teaching have given considerable recognition to the holy angels. Protestants seem to have reacted in a reverse way. It is as though we have decided to say nothing at all about the angels.

In Old Testament times and in the early Christian church, there were churchmen and scholars who gave much attention to matters relating to angelic hosts and their appearance. When Paul spoke of the creation to the Colossians, he mentioned both the visible and the invisible world, naming thrones, powers, rulers, authorities (Colossians 1:16). Often these have been perceived of as ranks or degrees of angelic beings and their authority and power.

Prayer

Forgive me, Father, for closing my mind to the reality of angels--that reality which Your revealed Word makes clear.

Thought

Angels are referred to somewhat sparingly in the Old Testament but the the New Testament opens with angelic announcement of the births of John the Baptist and Jesus; the book of Revelation has over 70 references to angels; and there is considerable mention in the synoptic Gospels and the Acts. All of which is to say that angelic reality is clearly established in the Scriptures.

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