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Poll: 1 of 2 Americans Praying for Finances, New Job

( [email protected] ) Oct 25, 2008 03:17 PM EDT
As the stock markets continue riding rollercoaster after rollercoaster and reports show the economy spiraling downward, Americans are looking toward Heaven for signs of hope.
Trader Bradley Silverman rubs his eyes as he works on the New York Stock Exchange floor, Wednesday Oct. 1, 2008. (Photo: AP Images / Richard Drew)

As the stock markets continue riding rollercoaster after rollercoaster and reports show the economy spiraling downward, Americans are looking toward Heaven for signs of hope.

When asked "What are you praying for these days," nearly half of Americans who responded listed either financial relief or a new job, according to a new online poll by Guideposts.com.

"Financial Relief," the top response, was cited by 32 percent of respondents. Meanwhile, 20 percent of those polled said they were praying for the "United States and our leaders." For 15 percent of respondents, a "New Job" was the most pressing prayer topic.

"The level of concern that people have for their finances, jobs, retirement accounts, and relief from money problems is starkly evident by how prominent it is in their prayers," observed Anne Simpkinson, online managing editor at Guideposts.

To address these worries, Guideposts, a self-help resource of sorts, has planned a new six-part series, "How To Handle Tough Times."

The first article, which tells readers how to banish their worries, has been uploaded to the publication's Web site. Other features in the series will deal with topics that include: Lifting Your Spirits, Releasing Fear, Coping with Mistakes, Not Limiting Yourself, and Creating Solutions.

Guideposts.com also has practical articles on everyday financial-related matters, from buying a wedding gift on a budget to ways to climb out of debt. Stories also include tips from financial advisors such as Suze Orman and Dave Ramsey.

"We have a strong library of inspirational content and experts who are providing faith-filled messages and helpful to-dos to aid people in these tough times," said Simpkinson.

Friday marked the 79th anniversary of the day that, according to many market historians, the October 1929 stock market crash began. Black Thursday, as Oct. 24, 1929, is often referred to as, was followed by the catastrophic downturn of Black Monday and Black Tuesday that precipitated widespread panic and the onset of unprecedented and long-lasting consequences for the United States.

Historians most often use Black Tuesday as the starting date for the Great Depression that ensued the ’29 crash.