Relaymedia

Iranian Leader Declares House Churches a 'Threat' for Youth, Sparking Fear of Persecution

( [email protected] ) Nov 30, 2011 01:51 PM EST
Heydar Moslehi, Minister of Intelligence in Iran, has declared that house churches are a threat to youth, Mohaba News, an Iranian Christian News Agency, reported Monday. Moslehi's statement raises anxiety over new persecution among the Christian community.
Iran's Intelligence Minister Heydar Moslehi speaks with foreign and local media at a news conference in Tehran. Reuters/Morteza Nikoubazl

Heydar Moslehi, Minister of Intelligence in Iran, has declared that house churches are a threat to youth, Mohaba News, an Iranian Christian News Agency, reported Monday. Moslehi's statement raises anxiety over new persecution among the Christian community.

Moslehi reportedly acknowledged that a new series of efforts will be made to fight the growth of the house church movement in Iran, the agency reports.The government is also reportedly shifting toward a policy of preventing young people from becoming Christians.

"The house churches are a threat to the youth and the Ministry of Intelligence has already started a serious effort to oppose this movement," Moslehi was quoted as saying.

Only a year ago, a major raid on Iran's house churches took place on Dec. 26. The Christian community in Iran is now reportedly experiencing anxiety after Moslehi's statement.

The Iranian regime has been known especially for its anti-Christian attitude for a while.

In September, the Iranian ambassador to the Vatican reportedly indicated that evangelical Christianity is a political phenomenon which the "imperialist system" uses to create enmity between Islam and Christianity.

"Today, improper Hijab and anarchy are political tools to oppose the Islamic regime and in just the same way, the imperialists are working with political anger and prejudice to break the relation between Iran and Vatican," the ambassador reportedly said at the time, during a conference called "Islamic awakening and the world of Christianity" in Vatican City.

Iran is an overwhelmingly Shia Muslim country, with the followers of Islam (Shia at 89 and Sunni at 9 percent) constituting together 98 percent of the population. Christian, Zoroastrian, Jewish and Baha’i people together constitute only 2 percent of the population.

According to U.S.-based organization Iranian Christians International, Inc. (ICI), the persecution of the Christian community started in Iran after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, after foreign missionaries were chased out of the country.

Since then, "If an Iranian called himself a Christian, he now had to be willing to pay a high price for his faith," the organization states on its website.

By 2002, ICI estimated, the number of Iranian Christians worldwide was over 60,000, half being Muslim converts and the other half from various religious minorities.

The Iranian government and its religious elite have been the target of criticism from the international Christian community for one more reason recently.

The Iranian authorities have been holding Iranian Christian pastor Youcef Nadarkhani in jail after his arrest in Dec. 2006. Nadarkhani was charged with apostasy, that is, leaving the Muslim faith, and with evangelizing to Muslims.

He was released two weeks later, without being charged, but then arrested again in 2009 and sentenced to death in Sept. 2010 after a court of appeals in Rasht, Iran, found him guilty of leaving Islam. The pastor remains imprisoned and reports coming from Iran say his health has been deteriorating.