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Groundbreaking 'Abortion Pill Reversal' Procedure Saves over 70 Babies From Death

( [email protected] ) Apr 10, 2015 09:58 PM EDT
The groundbreaking procedure known as the "Abortion Pill Reversal," which blocks the effects of progesterone which leads to the death of a developing baby, is making waves among the pro-life community and helping dozens of women reverse life-altering decisions.
Of all unintended pregnancies, 4 in 10 are aborted. There are approximately 1.21 million abortions in America each year, according to recent statistics. LifeSite News

The groundbreaking procedure known as the "Abortion Pill Reversal," which blocks the effects of progesterone which leads to the death of a developing baby, is making waves among the pro-life community and helping dozens of women reverse life-altering decisions.

The Abortion Pill Reversal, which is program of Culture of Life Family Services headquartered in San Diego, California, has a network of over 270 physicians worldwide to assist women that call the organization's hotline, which is staffed 24/7.

The reversal process, created 9 years ago by abortion reversal pioneer Dr. Matt Harrison, involves flooding a woman's body with progesterone, the pregnancy hormone, which in turn blocks the deadly effects of mifepristone, found in the abortion pill RU486.

"We know that an unplanned pregnancy can be scary and many women make decisions to abort their babies when they are terrified and stressed. We know that after some time thinking about it, many women would like to change their minds about a chemical abortion," reads a statement on the organization's website.

"Please...talk with one of our nurses who can guide you towards reversing the effects of the abortion pill. It's the right thing to do...and we will help you every step of the way."

While denounced by pro-abortion activists as "quack medicine" that is not a "valid procedure," the Abortion Pill Reversal hotline has documented 87 mothers who have used the reversal protocol and delivered healthy babies, and another 74 women are currently expecting.

One of procedure's success stories is Andrea Minichini, who decided to abort her baby after discovering she was pregnant while in college. Immediately after swallowing the abortion pill, Minichini regretted the decision.

"I ran out and actually started trying to throw up but nothing would come out," she told CBN News.

Desperate, the young woman visited several obstetricians and and even rushed to her local hospital's emergency room to halt the abortion process. However, doctors repeatedly told her there was no way out, and that she would need to take the second abortion pill within 24 hours.

Two days later, Minichini's mother discovered the Abortion Pill Reversal hotline, who referred her to a local doctor, who discovered the baby still had a heartbeat and that miraculously, he had survived a break in Minichini's placenta.

"The baby had, instead of going toward it, he had gone away from it. He had curled up in a little ball," Minichini said.

Today, a year after undergoing the reversal process, Minichini and son Gabriel are healthy and thriving.

While many of those who undergo the procedure have succeeded, another 40 percent have failed in their hope of reversing their abortion. The procedure has also been heavily combated by Planned Parenthood and other abortion-rights groups who argue that claims of reversal are unsupported by medical evidence.

However,  Dr. Harrison and other advocates say that while more research is undeniably needed, they will continue to fight for their life-saving measure.

"They have a very powerful machine out there that will make fun of this, that will attack this, that will say it's junk science, that it's not FDA-approved, do whatever they have to to combat it," Harrison said.

Meanwhile, Father Frank Pavone, national director of Priests for Life, is working with Harrison to raise awareness by distributing reversal kits to healthcare workers and pro-life advocates.

"The reversal technique gives us hope that we can say to her, 'It's not too late. We can save your baby,'" Pavone said.