Relaymedia

Governors in NC and NY Clash Over Anti-Transgender, Privacy Law For Public Restrooms, Facilities

( [email protected] ) Mar 31, 2016 06:38 PM EDT
North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory announced Tuesday he will not repeal a state law that now blocks local governments from allowing people to use public bathrooms based on their own selection or personal gender identity. "This political correctness has gone amok," he said. "If you have the anatomy of a man, we firmly believe you shouldn't use the women's restroom, showers or locker facility."
North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory announced this week he will not repeal what some are calling the new North Carolina LGBT discrimination law, even though Equality North Carolina and the Human Rights Campaign initiated a letter now signed by 80 companies urging McCrory to do so. Some of the larger companies that signed the letter include Facebook, YouTube, Apple, Twitter and Yahoo. New York Gov. Andres Cuomo called for a boycott of travel to North Carolina. Reuters / Mike Theiler

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory announced Tuesday he will not repeal a state law that now blocks local governments from allowing people to use public bathrooms based on their own selection or personal gender identity. "This political correctness has gone amok," he said. "If you have the anatomy of a man, we firmly believe you shouldn't use the women's restroom, showers or locker facility."

Reacting to this firm stance on this particular public matter, New York Gov. Andres Cuomo called for a boycott of travel to North Carolina. "It's demagoguery at its worst," was McCrory's reaction Thursday.

McCrory referenced the criticism to North Carolina's position as "political theater."

North Carolina has been the target of a vicious, nationwide smear campaign, said McCrory in a public statement.

"Disregarding the facts, other politicians, from the White House to mayors and city council members and yes our Attorney General, have initiated and promoted conflict to advance their political agenda. Even if it means defying the constitution and their oath of office. As elected officials we don't get to choose the perfect circumstances that surround the decision we have to make under the constitution," McCrory's statements reads.

"Obeying the laws of the land, living up to the duties of the office and defending the constitution is the foundation of my governorship. I am standing up to the president of the United States to prevent federal overreach to take over our North Carolina waters in violation of the U.S. Constitution," said McCrory.

"I even stood up to the legislative leaders of my own party when they took powers not delegated to them in the North Carolina constitution, and our Supreme Court agreed."

McCrory said he is now standing up to the Attorney General of North Carolina who refused to fulfill his oath of office to defend the people of North Carolina in a lawsuit filed over the privacy of the state's restrooms. 

"As the state's attorney, he can't select which laws he will defend and which laws are politically expedient to refuse to defend. When you are the state's lawyer, you are a lawyer and a politician second. Therefore, I encourage the Attorney General to reconsider his flawed logic. I am fulfilling my oath of office as Governor of North Carolina and we expect him to do the same as Attorney General," said McCrory.

The North Carolina governor said he signed the bill because if he didn't, the expectation of privacy of N.C. citizens could be violated as of April 1.

"This is not about demonizing one group of people," said McCrory. "Let's put aside our differences, the political rhetoric and yes, hypocrisy, and work on solutions that will make this bill better in the future. I am open to new ideas and solutions."

"It's up to businesses to make that determination, not government," McCrory told Fox News during a Thursday interview about who should be able to use what public restrooms and gym facilities.

He said N.C. people and business owners are a "state of inclusiveness, openness and diversity," but that this matter involved basic common sense and an etiquette of privacy that's been in place for decades. He said he believed this expectation of privacy must be honored and respected.