Relaymedia

Christians in Pakistan Cautioned The Government Not To Play With Their Religious Feelings in Church Demolition

( [email protected] ) May 12, 2016 03:05 PM EDT
Christians in Pakistan took to the streets and gathered in front Lahore High Court to protest the planned demolition of four churches to pave the way for the construction of a new railway, a report that Pakistani authorities vehemently denied.
Activist Nasir Saeed cautions Pakistan's government not to play with the religious feelings of the Christian minority. Photo: Comment

Christians in Pakistan took to the streets and gathered in front Lahore High Court to protest the planned demolition of four churches to pave the way for the construction of a new railway, a report that Pakistani authorities vehemently denied.

The group said they will never allow their places of worship be destroyed, nor will they allow distractions from their place of worship and prayers. The protesters chanted slogans, "We do not give an inch of our holy places" and "we want our rights."

The issue involves the churches of Naulakha, St. Andrew's, Bohar Wala and the Cathedral. Component of the project is a metro line 16 feet under St. Andrew's Church and laying tracks through the grounds of Bohar Wala Church.

The spokesman of Lahore Development Authority assured the churches won't be touched, only a portion of the property it occupied for use as a storage area of construction material and room for stairs leading underground.

Politicians and Islamist organizations have reportedly been jealous of Christian churches' occupation of prime properties, and they have been eager to grab those lands and belittle the Christians.

"It offers no difference of the situation," Nasir Saeed on LDA's explanation, adding "there is no respite for them, and one problem after the other seems to follow Pakistani Christian."

He said granting the church structure will not be touch, but the construction and the start of railway operation will definitely disrupt worship, and potentially cause damage to the buildings.

Saeed said the government should not play with Christian's religious feelings and should avoid further aggrieving and pressuring the Christian minority in Pakistan.

"There is fear that freedom of worship is challenged especially if the train is with thousands of Muslim passengers," he added.